What I’ve Learned From All Of My Jobs

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It dawned on me earlier this year that I’ve officially been part of the workforce for more than twenty years. It all started when I was ten years old and wanted a Barbie Sweet Roses 3-Piece Wall Unit for my dollhouse. It cost $12.95 and with my allowance there was no way I could afford it. I ended up going to work with my mom, who was a master dog groomer. She paid me 25¢ for each dog I bathed. It was hard work, but worth it in the end.

I can’t begin to say how proud I was to go to Toys R’ Us with my hard-earned money and buy one awesome Barbie Sweet Roses 3-Piece Wall Unit. The funny thing is, I still have it.  Every time I even think about putting it the donation pile, I remember how hard I worked for it and I just dust it off and rearrange the “China” plates and cups inside of it. (Yes, I still have my dollhouse, too. My Grandpa built it).

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Not a single piece is missing! Intact since 1988.

Despite the money I earned, dog bathing just wasn’t for me. I got my first “real” job when I was fifteen (and a half). I spent my summers with my grandparents in small Northern Wisconsin town, so it was only natural that my first job would be in a tiny family owned business. For two summers, I worked at the Christmas House as a cashier and stocker in the midst of tourist season. I still consider it the most fun job I’ve ever had. It was literally Christmas every day! I set up Department 56 villages, decorated Christmas trees, hung up lights, and created beautiful displays of dishes and figurines. In the middle of all that fun, I learned about collectibles (what’s valuable, what’s not, and how to tell) and Christmas traditions from all around the world. Sadly, the Christmas House closed it’s doors last year.

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The Christmas House as I saw it last summer. So sad to see it closed.

My love of animals led to a job at Petsmart. I was a cashier and also did some floor work (cleaning up shelves). While I loved the animals, I hated the corporate atmosphere. I also hated having to wear a back brace every day (I sometimes had to lift enormous bags of dog food). The only take-away I got from this job was having a healthy respect for anyone who works in a big store. It’s not easy cleaning up after customers who don’t put things away or make huge messes down each aisle. To this day, if I change my mind about something I want to buy in a store, I put it back where I found it instead of on some random shelf.

After leaving Petsmart, I went back to working for a smaller company. It must’ve been my artistic side that drew me to the idea of working for a flower shop. My job was to unpack, clean, and display each day’s shipment of fresh flowers. Then, keep the floors and cooler clean, water the front showroom plants, and take orders over the phone. Being around so many beautiful flowers was wonderful, but the work was brutal. My hands paid the price with cracked skin and permanently green grooves. On the up side, I learned how to do a variety of floral arrangements ranging from corsages, funeral wreathes, and wedding bouquets, along with the standard vase and bowl arrangements. Not a bad skill set, indeed.

Desperately needing to fix my damaged hands, I started working for The Body Shop. This is the job where I learned how to sell, sell, sell. Every day I was responsible for meeting certain dollar quota. Talk about pressure!  I never thought of myself as a salesperson, but I dug deep and learned how sell every product in that store. That meant learning everything about perfume oils, lotions, body washes, and creams. I even learned how to do in-store make-overs to sell cosmetics. Make-up has never been my favorite thing, but it was a lot of fun to make people feel pretty. I would have stayed at The Body Shop longer, but the arrival of a new fragrance ignited a pretty severe allergic reaction. I couldn’t even touch the bottle, so I had to quit.

In the same mall, just around the corner was a locally owned store called the Hobby Bench. It sold everything from cross stitch patterns to radio controlled cars. Even before I applied for the job of cashier, the Hobby Bench was one of my favorite stores. I was hired instantly and stayed there for almost five years. Aside from learning a number of new crafts, this is the job where I learned how to handle crabby and attitudinal people. Within a year, management had me working returns. In a store that didn’t give cash refunds. And always on the day after Christmas. I took a verbal beating often and that caused me to develop some pretty tough skin along with some witty diplomatic strategies. I was studying to be a teacher at the time, so these skills ended up being an essential part of my education.

It may seem amazing that I stayed through all the verbal assaults, but it really wasn’t a hard choice to remain at my post. The Hobby Bench was where I met my soul mate. While I rang up customers in the front, he sold and fixed R/C cars and trucks in the back. Even the crappiest jobs feel like heaven when you’re best friend and love is working just a few feet away. It’s been fifteen years and we’re still together, even without the Hobby Bench, (about three years ago, “our” Hobby Bench closed down).

I continued to work at the Hobby Bench during my first two years of teaching. Then, one day I decided it was time to let it go. My focus had shifted from a job that just paid the bills, to a career that means so much to me. I’ve been teaching for the past thirteen years and it is every bit as rewarding and challenging as I thought it would be. Some days are difficult, but most of the time I’m thankful to have a job that brings me so much joy. There are million things I could complain about, (as the public education system is far from perfect), but this is the only job I’ve ever had where I have an immense amount of control over my day. I get to decide how to teach material and I can be creative in everything I do. However, the best thing of all is watching a kid learn. I love it when a student tells me “I hated history until now.” Yup, that’s a good day at work!

I will likely remain in the teaching profession until it’s time to retire. I honestly never thought I would last this long, but it turns out I’m tougher and more patient than most. If I’ve learned anything from this job, it’s that the key to staying in the classroom is the willingness to learn as if you’re still a student. No one knows everything, not even a teacher.

But, I do still know how to make one hell of a two dozen rose vase arrangement!

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c.b.w. 2014

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20 thoughts on “What I’ve Learned From All Of My Jobs

  1. What is so commendable is your dedication to each job, doing it well and learning from it. That curiosity and desire “to know” about things was a fine foundation for your teaching skills. it’s good to know that you will stick with it. I’ve been a teacher for 42 years, and there is nothing more satisfying than seeing students discover their skills in thinking and communicating those thoughts well. Blessings.

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    • My mother taught me to have a strong work ethic right from the start. :-)

      Teaching really is a wonderful job. I’m thankful to have a such a special and worthwhile profession. I never feel like I’m wasting a day. :-)

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    • Every job I’ve ever had gave me a skill I still use today. I swear my garden does well because of everything I learned at the flower shop, my skin looks good because of what I learned at the body shop, my craft closet is full of fun ideas because of the Hobby Bench, and teaching throws something new at me every day! Even though I knew none of those early jobs would be my profession, they still taught me some incredible things!

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  2. “However, the best thing of all is watching a kid learn. I love it when a student tells me “I hated history until now.” Yup, that’s a good day at work!” Agree completely. Some days teaching is hard, but that moment right there is what it’s all about. Great post, and don’t forget to be awesome!

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  3. I remember being your “intern” at the flower shop for a few days on vacation. I also have a poloroid picture of the Christmas House. 13 years is impressive and hard to believe because it’s gone by so fast.

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  4. It’s nice to be able to keep some of those things you had in childhood! I have a few, although I have such a tiny little flat, I don’t have room for a dolls house – the thought of using my spidery loft for storage, doesn’t appeal! ;)

    It’s good you found a job you really enjoy, and teaching history should be enjoyable – it’s a fascinating subject. Any teacher that makes it boring – well, there’s something terribly wrong there! I had a teacher in my primary school at age 10, and he was very eccentric, one of the ‘old school’ type teachers. History was his personal favourite subject, so when it came to history, it was amazing and such fun. He’s probably the teacher I remember the most!

    But I got a real shock when I went to my secondary school at 13, my history teacher there was sooooo dull. She persisted in teaching us about the Druids, getting us to write out long boring bits from text books, and even after six months she still hadn’t moved on to anything new – I could believe it, there must have been something seriously wrong with her ideas of teaching. I had some similar issues with a few other teachers in that school too – it was a bad school, but the local education authorities refused to let me go to any other school in the area. I left in the end, and was educated at home, it was the only option left to me. So good teachers can have such a life giving effect, and the bad ones – just kill your soul. :sad: I hope you continue to enjoy your work and the kids enjoy you!! :D

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    • I had a horrible World History teacher when I was in high school. She took a subject I loved and managed to suck all the life out of it. I think that experience is what planted the seed in me to be a teacher. I wanted to make history as fun and interesting as possible. My American History teacher was amazing and she showed me what great teaching is all about. Between her methods and my desire to make history a fun, my profession was born! :-)

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