Finding The Balance

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Every writer I know has one. That thing that gets in the way and sucks up a huge portion of the day – a day job. Very few writers make enough money to survive solely from writing, so finding the balance between following the muse and paying the bills is a real challenge.

As much as I love what I do for a living, it does dig into my writing time. This is especially true after a long summer of being able to write all day long at a leisurely pace. If I wanted to spend five hours working on one poem or reading through one chapter of my edited manuscript, I could and I did.

The first week back to work is always a huge reality check in that my time becomes much more restricted and my attention span much more exhausted. I don’t have five hours to write, nor do I have the energy to head to my favorite coffee shop every evening. There is only so much time in a day and along with working I have to fit in everything from husband time to eating and sleeping. That doesn’t leave a lot time for writing, so I have to make the most of any moment that isn’t being sucked up by something else!

At the beginning of every school year, I have to sit down and create a new writing schedule to help me find the balance between the real world and my fantasy world of words. Otherwise, my stories and poems start collecting dust as my free time evaporates.

So, this the writing schedule I’ve come up with so far …

Monday:
– Write blog post for Wednesday
– Read

Tuesday:
– Attend writer’s group
– Write blog post for Sunday
– Read

Wednesday:
– Write blog post for Friday
– Write poem for Poetic Asides Wednesday Poetry Prompt
– Read

Thursday:
– Edit Sunday and Friday blog posts
– Read

Friday:
– Break from writing (unless the muse is chatty)
– Read

Saturday:
– Write Monday’s blog post
– Work on The Muse, (i.e. read through edited manuscript, make changes, work   on query package)
– Read

Sunday:
– Edit Monday’s blog post
– Work on The Muse, (i.e. read through edited manuscript, make changes, work on query package)
– Read

It may seem odd that I’ve included reading in a writing schedule, but I’m a firm believer that reading is an integral part of the writing process. Whether it’s fiction or non-fiction, I consider the work of others as a crucial part of learning how to craft a novel. Plus, I pledged to read 30 books in 2014 on goodreads. I really want to achieve that goal, so I have to keep turning those pages. Good thing I love to read!

Hopefully, with this schedule in place I’ll stay on top of my writing goals. The Muse is a huge priority and the last thing I want is for it to sit on the shelf. Staying connected with my readers is immensely important as well, which means I can’t slack off on blog posts, either. While it’s all a lot to handle, I relish the challenge.

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c.b.w. 2014

Paradise

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Pacific breeze,
paints the air blue
Float in the clouds,
drift to the ground
The lagoon stills,
and catches stones
Laden with cares,
until they sink
Green feathered trees,
wild jungle wings
A heartbeat thrums,
pumping new life

 

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Photo: Somewhere in French Polynesia (I can’t remember which island), c.b.w. 2001
Words: c.b.w. 2014

 

Favorite Thing Friday: Mistake Rib Scarf

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After I finished knitting the Veronica Slouch, I had a bunch of yarn left over. Instead of letting it slip into my growing collection of stash yarn, I decided to make a scarf to match my beautiful new hat, (See FTF: Chunky Cable Hat)

I opted for a mistake rib pattern as it gives the ordinary rib a little more personality. The texture of a mistake rib works so nicely with a thick yarn, so I knew it would be perfect for what was left of my Colinette Prism wool.

A quick search on Ravelry’s pattern database pulled up a great pattern that is super easy to follow, (Mistake Rib Scarf by Joan Janes).  Not only is it free, but it also offers several gauges so it can be adapted to different weights of yarn. I absolutely love how my scarf turned out!

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Mistake rib scarf with a twist!

In addition, the simplicity of the pattern allowed for a modification I wanted to make based on a scarf style I spotted on Pinterest. I always wear my scarves tucked into my jacket, so sewing one corner to the edge to create a permanent wrap shape really appealed to me. All I have to do is slip it over my head and it’s a perfect fit every time.

To add a little more style to the wrap around, I added a button to the attached corner. As it turned out, I had an extra button left over from my hat!  With this little detail, I truly have a matching set of accessories!

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It’s a wrap! (And a button)

It’s amazing what you can do with a little leftover yarn and an extra button!

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What’s your favorite thing this week?

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c.b.w. 2014