I Made Socks And You Can, Too!

Standard

There’s nothing more frustrating for a crafter than owning a pair of knitting needles and having no clue how to use them. The last time I touched my needles, I was a teenager who thought it would be fun to learn how to knit so I could make my grandfather a scarf for Christmas.  After an hour of struggling to cast on, I asked my mother to show me how, but its pretty tough for a left-hander to duplicate the handiwork of a right-hander.  Trying to reverse the entire process gave me a massive headache, so I had her cast on for me before showing me how to make the stitches.  I managed to learn a basic knit stitch, but the finished “scarf” looked more like a poncho. To this day, I’m pretty sure whatever I was doing was not knitting.  My knitting needles trickled to the bottom of a drawer and haven’t moved in years.

Even though my first attempt at knitting was a failure, I never lost the desire to learn how to turn a skein of yarn into something cool.  All I needed was a miracle to solve the southpaw conundrum and address my issues with hand-eye coordination (the calling card of a true klutz).  Who knew that miracle would show up during a Fourth of July shopping trip?  In the knitting aisle of a Hobby Lobby, I stumbled upon the Authentic Knitting Board Sock Loom.  Technically it only makes socks, but what a great way to start my knitting journey!

A work in progress on my Authentic Knitting Board Sock Loom

The KB Sock Loom comes with a fantastic DVD that offers easy-to-follow instructions for every step of the process from casting on, making a cuff, and creating the heel and toe.  Every step is broken down and repeated multiple times, which makes it easy to follow along in real time.  Before I knew it I had completed my first pair of socks!   My left-handed self will never again worry about trying to reverse the process or struggle with getting two needles to work together.

I’d heard knitting was addictive, but I never believed it until I made that first pair of socks.  Now, I can’t stop!  I’ve already made five more pairs and there’s another on the way.  Thin, thick, bright, neutral, striped, smooth, and ribbed – my new handmade socks are quickly replacing my boring white crew socks.

The first four pairs of socks I made were a basic rolled cuff design.  This simple flat stitch sock was a great way to learn and get comfortable with the overall process of top-to-toe knitting.

I really do wear these socks! They fit like a glove and are incredibly comfortable.

Surprisingly, no pattern is necessary beyond deciding how long to make the leg and foot.  There is a mathematical formula to calculate foot length, but I just used one of my old socks as a model. After I figured out my size, I recorded the number of the rows I stitched for both the leg and foot so I could replicate the results on future socks.

Once I got the hang of making a basic sock, I decided to be brave and attempt a ribbed cuff.  It turned out to be so easy, I couldn’t believe I hadn’t been doing it all along!

My very first pair of ribbed cuff socks.

For this pair of socks, I experimented further by using a thicker gauge yarn.  The socks looked a lot bigger than the others, but they ended being a perfect fit.  All I had to do was make a few adjustments by reducing the number of rows to knit for the leg and foot.  I can’t wait for winter to show up so I can wear these really bright and fun socks!

The success of making a ribbed cuff gave me enough confidence to attempt a ribbed pattern that runs the entire length of the sock.  I got this layout from a great pattern book by Leisure Arts, (see links below) and I’m still shocked at how easy it was to complete!

These horizontal rib pattern socks are easily my favorite! I can’t wait to make more in different colors.

My knitting addiction is only getting worse as I just ordered a new pattern book full of beautiful sock patterns.  Not to mention a new knitting board that does everything from scarves and tote bags to hats.  Within a month, I went from being a knitting outcast to a woman with a yarn basket that looks like this:

So much yarn and so little time!

– – –

My sock knitting adventure started with these tools of the trade:

Authentic Knitting Board Sock Loom

I’ve seen this brand of knitting board at all major craft store chains for around $25.00.  However, I’ve noticed they’re a little more expensive online.  Well worth the price, in my opinion, as they are very well-made with a hardwood frame and metal pegs.

Metal tally counter

Row counters in the knitting aisle are typically made of cheap plastic. My grandmother taught me a long time ago that a metal sports rep or tally counter is easier to use and very sturdy.  I found mine at a Sports Authority, but they are readily available on amazon.com.  A counter is essential for keeping track of row and stitch counts.

Sock Loom Basics (by Leisure Arts)

Loom Knitting Socks by Isela Phelps

Knitting Board Basics by Pat Novak

All three of the above books offer amazing patterns and additional how-to instructions.  They are worth every penny!

A few things I’ve learned:

  • Keep a knitting journal to record your personal sock pattern, (i.e. row and peg counts), or things you figure out along the way.
  • Dropped stitches are easy to fix as long as you don’t panic!
  • Yarn tension will make or break a sock.  Pulling the work yarn too tight will make it impossible to pull loops over the pegs.  However, allowing the yarn to hang too loose will create holes and a general mess.  Loops should be snug around the peg, but not tight!
  • To keep track of knit and purl stitch patterns, (as for a ribbed cuff) put masking tape around the edge of the knitting board as a means to mark the pegs.

– – –

Happy Knitting!

– – –

c.b.w. 2012

Advertisements

130 thoughts on “I Made Socks And You Can, Too!

  1. Wow!!!!!! I am so so impressed with your sock (and yarn!) collections! I’ve been able to manage the basics of knitting for a while now but I’ve never done anything in the round. For years now though I’ve been desperate to learn how to knit some cozy handmade socks to send to Grant in the fall/winter 🙂 Thanks so much for showing us all how accessible it actually is – I’ll get right on that as soon as October rolls around.

    Like

    • What a wonderful gift for Grant! It gets mighty cold in the midwest. 🙂 I just bought some super soft and chunky yarn the other night to make some cozy winter socks! I can’t wait to make them.

      Like

  2. I’m like Megan. I’ve dabbled in knitting, but haven’t mastered the round yet. But that loom is friggin’ awesome and I want one now. Beautiful socks, by the way.

    Like

  3. What a great post! I love your creations!!! I could never knit with needles either – and I’m right handed. This loom looks fun. It would be a great project for me and my daughter. Maybe Santa will bring us one… 😉

    Like

  4. So cool and adventurous! You’ll never find anything like those in the stores!! Even though I love your photos so I can see what you’ve done, still no spark of interest in taking up the sock loom 🙂

    Like

  5. C.B. , can I just place a Christmas order with you? 🙂 I do knit, I love to knit, but I can’t knit. By the time I’m finished with a piece, I usually have another scarf, if you know what I mean. But you have given me the urge to try again.

    Like

  6. Your socks are beautiful! About 13 years ago I took a community education class on knitting. I learned to make hot pot holders and slippers. I went on to make hot pot holders and slipper for pretty much everyone I knew! But my knitting skills never advanced beyond that. And then I had kids and all my priorities shifted. But someday I would love to get back into it! Great post, as usual. 🙂

    Like

  7. OMG – who doesn’t LOVE Hobby Lobby??? We’re getting one here, finally – I’ve been ordering online since I visited one in Austin, TX years ago. Now, tell me, how can a fan purchase a pair of your darling socks – winter fast approaches here in New England!

    Like

    • I was so excited when we got one last year! The first time I went to one was in Indiana and I was blown away. They have everything!

      p.s. I’m surprised how many people want me to make them socks! Who knew there was such a need? Lol! 😀

      Like

  8. Despite the beautiful knitted and crocheted products my Mom and Grandma created, the allure of yarn crafts has always eluded me, although I did have a round knitting loom when I was a kid. I never did anything much with it. I didn’t have the patience at the time. Your beautiful socks have almost enticed me to try it, but I have so much on the go already. I think your favorite pair of socks is my favorite, too. I simply adore the color scheme. 🙂

    Like

  9. Heart to Harp’s post on the sock loom lead me here. I never managed knitting needles, but had great success with a crochet hook and several years weaving fabric on a floor loom. This looks like a magical combination of the primitive frame loom and crochet/rug hook. Ordering the lot from Amazon!! Just in time for a chilly weather project …

    Like

  10. Oh, I love the socks!!! I can’t decide which pair I like the best. Isn’t it addictive!! I have a drawer full of socks and I wear them all the time. We really are kindred spirits!! I have a skein of alpaca that I am going to use next. Such luxury!!

    Like

  11. Amber Fox

    I need encouragement!!! I too, have always been a knitting dunce and have at the same time, I have always wanted to create with yarn! I purchased a KB sock loom this weekend and keep falling into discouragement. I was doing well, and felt like i was at least understanding a basic flat stitch and had about 2 inches of a sock made for my daughter in real fine yarn when suddenly I touched one of the areas that looked a little funky and before my eyes, my stiches all began to unravel in that part of the sock. Ugh! I was sooo disappointed. Not knowing what to do, I just took it off and unraveled it all and tried not to cry! So then I decided to try basic soft yarn to make a pair for my husband, thinking that maybe a bigger sized yarn would be better and after casting on (cable cast on) and knitting over, the yarn is soooo tight on the board, I can’t knit anything. I’m not sure what to do. I soooo desire to make this work as the little that I did I found extremly enjoyable and gratifying. Any help or suggestions would be much appreciated! Thank you!

    Like

    • Oh, no! Sounds like you had a dropped stitch or the yarn split when you trying to fix the problem. Sometimes the best thing to do is unravel and start over, (I’ve had to do that more than once).

      When casting on, I’ve found the e-wrap method is best especially for a beginner. It is simple and creates a nice finish. Here’s a great how-to video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnzuBEGhgr4

      As for the yarn being too tight, that is a newbie issue! New knitters tend to pull the yarn too tight, so its important to be very aware of your tension. My advice is to make sure you don’t yank it, but also that you don’t let the yarn go limp. Somewhere in the middle is perfect – let the yarn flow freely as you work.

      Happy knitting! 🙂

      Like

      • Amber Fox

        Thank you so much for your help! I will watch the video and try, try again! It’s good to know that these are issues you have encountered! That alone gives me the encouragment to start again! I hope soon I can make socks as nice as yours!

        Like

    • Rose

      The youtube video is no longer up there. Just getting interested and started to purchase the looms and trying to figure out which is the best yarn to buy. Like to think and learn from other people before I go head first into a project. Knitted years ago, and have been crocheting a lot over the last 4 years. If there is another good video up there on sock loom, please let me know. Thanks

      Like

      • It looks like they’ve moved all their videos to an actual channel on youtube. Here’s the link:

        Any lightweight sock yarn will work (Weight #2 or #3 are best) on the original KB sock loom. Happy Knitting!

        Like

  12. Teresa M. Stanley

    I need some guidance please. I did the calculation for the sock & I ended up needing 55 pegs. I cast on all 55 pegs & worked all 55 pegs by knitting/purling to make the cuff. The cuff opening was HUGE. Once I cast on all 55 pegs how do I go about knitting/purling a cuff so that it is a smaller to hug the ankle like a normal sock. I have tried many different approaches and none of them end up right.

    Like

    • Quick question: What kind of yarn did you use? Sometimes using yarn that is too thick or too thin can cause a wide cuff.
      Gauge is everything in knitting both for overall size and elasticity. In my own experience, I found using thicker yarn made for super tight stitches and had no give for the cuff, so I ended up with wide cuffs!

      Like

    • Teresa M. Stanley

      The first yarn I tried was a finger weight 1 and the second yarn was a finger weight 3. I knitted/purled a rib cuff. I read in a sock pattern book that the number of pegs you knit determines the size of the cuff opening. I tried using less pegs and got a smaller cuff but then I ended up with a sock for a child. When I use more pegs for an adult sock the opening is way too wide.

      Like

      • I’ve never altered my pegs according to the cuff size I wanted. The only measurement I use is the circumference around the ball of the foot.

        I’ve used both weights of yarn you mentioned, but I’ve found anything above a two will inevitably lead to a wide cuff with no elasticity. There are so many reasons why you could be ending up with a wide cuff, so I’m just going to brainstorm a couple of ideas:
        * Try to use yarn designed for making socks. My favorite yarn is Paton’s Kroy Sock. For some reason, this yarn gives me the best ribbed cuffs.
        * Evaluate your knitting tension. Are you a loose or tight knitter? Too loose or too tight can lead to a mishapen cuff.
        * Try different cast on methods. In my own experience, the e-wrap method makes the cuff loose on top, so I tried a few different cast on methods until I found one that matched my knitting style.
        * Consider knitting a small string of elastic along with your yarn into the top portion. I’ve never tried this, (because I don’t like my cuffs to be very tight), but I’ve seen other do it.
        * Sometimes throwing your socks in the washer and dryer will tighten up the ribbing. Just make sure the yarn you used can go in the dryer!

        Like

      • Teresa M. Stanley

        I’m now using a #2 finger weight. I don’t know how to read a yarn wrapper. In the box with a pair of knitting needles it says 4mm, US 6 and in the box with the crochet needle it says 5mm, US H/8. My pattern called for 7 stitches and 12 rounds = 1 inch but the yarn wrapper box with the knitting needles I’m now using says 19 stiches, 26 rows. I looked at every yarn wrapper at JoAnn’s and couldn’t find a 7 stiches, 12 rounds = 1 inch type of yarn. Please help me to understand.

        Like

      • The best thing a knitter can do is make a swatch to test the gauge. Cast on with the yarn you bought (#2 should be good) and knit 12 rounds as per the pattern. Bind off and pull out your measuring tape and measure the length. If you have an inch, you’re right on target, if not you can either change yarns or make adjustments to the pattern (in terms of length). Then, lay your measuring tape across your rows and count how many stitches are in an inch. If you have 7 stitches to the inch your gauge is right, if not, now you know to make adjustments, (either in the pattern or with your yarn).

        It’s rare to find a yarn that matches the gauge on the pattern perfectly. Needle knitters can easily make adjustments, but sock looms are a bit trickier! Stick with weight 1 or 2 yarn and you should be okay. After a while, you’ll get better and figuring out what yarns will work and what won’t.

        p.s. Most knitters make a four inch swatch to allow a pattern stitch and tension to play out more accurately.

        Like

  13. alicia

    I just bought one and am so excited but confused! I can not for the life of me figure out how to measure the ball of your heel and then do all this math just to figure out how many pegs to use. Can you please help??? Love how your socks turned out! ~alicia

    Like

      • alicia

        I looked at a group in Ravelry and her math equation was a bit easier… I measured about a 9 around the ball of my foot (you measure all away around right?). So doing her math, I came up with 54 pegs….does that sound about right?

        Like

      • I was going to say 54 or 56 pegs! 54 will give you a tighter (negative ease fit) and a 56 will be a little looser. You should measure all the way around the ball of the foot so you can customize the width of your sock. I tend to like looser fitting socks, so I always add 2 to 4 pegs above where the math leaves me. 🙂

        For the heel, you’ll break the first half of your pegs into thirds. If you’re working 56 pegs you’ll have 8 unwrapped pegs after the wrapping process.

        Another good tip if math isn’t your thing (personally, I hate it!), check out the pattern book I mentioned in this post. I use those base patterns to figure out how many pegs to make for a give size of socks. Size 7 and Size 8 are represented, so its easy to “steal” their peg count. 🙂

        Like

  14. Nikki

    Hello,
    I have started a sock on the loom 2 the problem is that the cuff is way to big, I believe that I followed the instructions correctly.

    Please help me…..

    Thanks Nikki

    Like

    • Hi Nikki,

      I just need to know a few things before I can figure out why your cuff is too big:
      1. What yarn are you using: brand and weight
      2. How many inches have you knitted
      3. What rib pattern are you using (k1,p1 or k2,p2 etc …?)
      4. What cast on method did you use?
      5. Are you using the KB Authentic Knitting Loom or something else?

      Like

      • Nikki

        Im using the red heart yarn weight 4,
        The cuff is about 2″ with the k1 p1 pattern. I used the e wrap cast on method using the kb sock loom 2.
        Thanks for answering me I’m new to knitting.

        Like

      • Well, there’s a few things that could be happening here. My first thought is that in my experience the k1p1 rib never seems to work that well on a loom. Whenever, I’ve tried it the cuff is huge just like you described. Instead, I use a k2p2 rib as that seems to work the best. I think the wider rib allows for more elasticity, especially with a thicker yarn like you’re using. You might even consider trying a k3p2 rib for even more elasticity.

        Secondly, if you’ve only got two inches total of knitting, that means the cuff is still pretty close to the pegs, right? I’ve found it takes knitting about 2″ of cuff and 2″ of leg before the cuff starts to shrink smaller than the rest of the leg. Keep knitting until the cuff is further away from the loom and it should start to constrict!

        Thirdly, if you’ve tried the solutions I’ve outlined and the cuff is still wider than you prefer, most craft stores carry a quick fix. Hiding in the knitting tools is a super thin elastic thread that you can combine with your working yarn and knit into the cuff. This gives a little stretch and also helps the cuff shrink a little tighter, (and the elastic is practically invisible!). 🙂

        I hope this helps! If you have more questions, I’ll do my best to help. 🙂

        Happy Knitting!

        Like

  15. Nikki

    OMG THANK YOU SOOO MUCH. The sock is coming out great. I’m now it the toe. I have seen some ppl redue the heel for the toes is that what I should do.. can you help plzzzzzz.

    Like

  16. Nikki

    Ooo one more thing I have received the sock loom 1 and I LOVE it. Remember I started out with the kb sock loom 2, so I waited until I got the first one so that I can use my sock yarn.. And whooo whoo I LOVE it.

    Like

      • Nikki

        I knitted the toes to short is there a way to fix it? Also can you give me an idea of how much rounds of the toes do you knit. And after doing the toes how much rounds should be done before closing the toes?

        Like

      • Are they too short horizontally (across the toe) or vertically?

        On my loom, I knit toes and heels with the short row method, (i.e. wrapping pegs). That method has always given me a perfect toe. What method are you using?

        Like

  17. Nikki

    I ewraped also. Its short vertically. I guess I would have to do more rounds to make the sock longer. It does fit my sons foot. And hes a kids 12 shoe size.

    Like

    • If you’re using the wrap method, that means you wrapped in two complete curcuits. In the first circuit you set up the initial wraps and the second circuit, you work each wrapped stitch until there are no more wrapped pegs to work. After that, the toe is done and you can’t really add more rows. So, I think your problem isn’t that the toe is too short – most toes only add 1.75 to 2 inches to the length – but rather that the foot is too short. You need to unknit the toe and add to the length of the foot.

      Like

  18. Verena

    Hey I’m from Germany. Just got the kb sock loom. I measured around the ball of my foot. 23cm came out so like 9,05 inches…I ended up with 54 pegs. You think that’s ok? , would appreciate your help and wisdom about this for a beginner like me. Thanks
    Verena

    Like

    • Hello – 52 pegs should work, but it’ll be a snug fit. If you want a little more ease try 56 pegs. The pattern your using can also effect fit – ribbed socks have more stretch, which makes it possible to use fewer pegs. However, flat stitch or knit stitch socks aren’t as stretchy so it’s better to use more pegs.

      Good luck with your loom! Let us know how your socks turn out!

      Like

    • I’ve heard the same thing, but even after a year of knitting with needles I can’t make my left hand “behave.” Instead, I’ve learned to knit in a totally non-conformist way. So far, it seems to be working. 🙂

      Like

  19. jennie

    Hi’ I got a sock loom this week after reading your original post. I already love it.Almost finished my first sock today and only started using it yesterday.I’ve started with the premmie socks from the Sock :Loom Basic’s book. I’m already wondering about getting the Sock Loom 2, Thanks for your postings.

    Like

  20. Stumbled on to this blog. Your socks look great. I am on sock two of my first pair. Loving it so far. The heel drives me batty and I haven’t got it perfect yet. Your heels look awesome any tips? I am doing short row heels and wrap to turn is where the problem is. Well the increasing I tend to drop stitches and don’t recover them fully I think

    Like

    • The trick with the short row method is to take your time and complete the entire circuit in one sitting (that’s my strategy, anyway!). Dropping stitches is all too easy when lifting loops off the pegs, but I’ve learned to use the curve of the hood to my advantage. Let the lifted loop slide to the curve and keep it there until it’s back on the peg. Keep all the tension on the curve, so the loop doesn’t wander off the tip. Once the loop is back on the peg, it’s easy to slip the hook out. 🙂 Good luck!

      Like

  21. Hi there! Your socks are so cute! I’m super novice on this and just started on the cuff yesterday and just notice it’s wide! I set my loom to 50 pegs and doing e-cast on and k2,p2 for the pattern. My shoes size is 7 and the widest part is 19″. Did I set the pegs too wide? Oh and I’m using premier wool-free yarn weight 2. Thank you so much! Your post really help me to get started. You rock! 🙂

    Like

    • Sounds like you’ve got a nice set up if you’re using the standard sock loom (not the one with plastic pegs for thicker yarn). I wear the same size as you and I usually hover between 48 and 52 pegs depending on the stitch pattern.

      I love how this post has inspired so many people to make their own socks. It’s so much fun! 🙂 Enjoy making your socks!

      Like

  22. carol Capper

    i just got a sock loom (kb original, adjustable, metal pegs) and am thinking to buy a book. i have used isela’s loom knitting videos before for kk looms and think she’s very clear and great. would you recommend her book first or the one you started with first? is one more basic than the other? tia…

    Like

      • carol Capper

        Thank you! (Sorry, just seeing your reply now.) I will get that book. In the meantime, I have started my first sock. I went with the k2p2 and am almost at the heel. Trying to decide whether to continue the ribbing on the top of the foot and just use stockinette on the bottom, or to do the whole foot in stockinette. If I continue the ribbing, I assume I just continue the pattern on half the pegs and stockinette on half, but I don’t know which pegs are the top and which are the bottom. I guess once I do the heel, it will be more clear. Any advice? also, do you flat knit your foot so they are more sturdy? or just continue whatever knit stitch you were using for your ribbing?

        Like

      • If you wish to continue the ribbing on the top of the foot, you will continue the pattern over the second half of your pegs. You want the bottom of the sock to be flat just like the heel, so you’ll stockinette stitch the first half of your pegs.

        Whenever I do stockinette, I always use a flat stitch, (whether it’s on the leg or foot). It’s just my personal preference, so I’d do what you feel the most comfortable doing.

        Like

      • carol Capper

        ok, that’s what i thought. thank you! i’ve just completed the heel and am ready to do the foot. i think i will do the pattern on top. one more question. i had my pegs marked from my ribbing before. should i keep the same pegs the same as before or does it matter?

        Like

      • carol Capper

        so excited. thanks for all your help! didn’t work on it much today, but my first sock is almost done. i should finish it tomorrow. one thing i noticed is that when i measured the leg, i wanted 7″ and it turned out longer. i can never really seem to get the measuring tape all the way up to the pegs i guess. plus the heel adds length, which i didn’t think about. well, that is fine, but i don’t want the foot section ending up too long. how do i estimate the length of the foot? do you think the same thing will happen with the length of the foot? do i measure my foot from heel to toe and just plan to make it a little smaller than that measurement? what do you usually do?

        Like

      • Whenever you turn a heel or a toe, it adds about 1.5″ to the length. So when you work on the foot, you’ll want to make it about 1.5″ shorter to accommodate for the toe. Always measure from the back of the heel to get a somewhat accurate measurement. Although, sometimes I’ll just slip on the sock while it’s still on the loom – when the knitted section hits the base of my big toe, I know it’s time to start turning the toe on the loom. 🙂

        Like

  23. carol Capper

    several sources said different things: one said subtract 1.5 inches from the total foot measurement, one said subtract 2 inches, and another said 2.5 inches. so i did exactly what you said. i looked at the heel and figured the toe was going to add the same amount of length and tried it on several times while it was still on the loom. when it came off the loom, it fit me perfectly! thanks for all your help! i really appreciate it! you totally inspired me to want to knit myself (and others…maybe 🙂 ) a drawer full of comfy, colorful socks!

    Like

    • The different measurements can be the result of differing gauges. If you used a typical lightweight sock yarn, it’s about 1.5″. Different gauges can be confusing, so that’s why I recommend trying the sock on to get a sense of when to start the toe. After making a few more pairs, you’ll start to learn how much length the heel and toe adds and be able to make adjustments accordingly. It just takes practice! 🙂

      Like

  24. I am a newbie loom knitter. I am working on baby socks and am using 34 pegs. I am ready to start working the heel. Do I just divide the amount of pegs to work the heel by 2 or is there a special equation that I should use to determine the number of pegs to use for the heel?

    Like

  25. cassied17

    What stitch are you using for the main body of the sock? Is that the flat stitch?
    I’m trying my first sick on the KB loom now and it doesn’t look like your stitches. I’m wondering what I’m doing wrong. I can’t see how this will look knitted.

    Like

  26. Caitlyn

    Fellow Lefty here 😉 I just bought the Kb sock loom and was really excited to use it to make my very first pair of socks.

    The DVD instructions specifically say that the first peg is the one on the right, adjacent to the sliders, and that you have to knit going from right to left. How did you make this work for you using your left hand?
    I can’t, for the life of me, hold the yarn above the e-wrap (to knit), or below the e-wrap (to purl), with my LEFT hand, while yarning over using the hook, with my RIGHT hand (because I’m a lefty!) If it were reversed, that would work, but then, wouldn’t every pattern that is made for the Kb sock loom be messed up if I did it that way? Am I missing something? I’m starting to feel really stupid and just ready to give up. Please help!

    -A Lefty Loomer Going Loco 😦

    Like

    • Hi Caitlyn,

      My apologies for such a late reply! (I was on vacation). Adapting to the loom as a lefty is really easy. You do start with the peg indicated in the DVD and you do knit from right to left. I hold the hook in my left hand the working yarn in my right hand. It works exactly the same way as in the DVD – we just hold things differently! I hold the work yarn between my index and middle finger and it slides perfectly across the pegs as I work the stitches. Keep the skein of yarn above the loom or off to the right and it won’t get tangled with what you’re doing. 🙂

      Like

      • I’ve never tried knitting backwards, but it would probably be interesting to try. Just remember to flip everything you see in a pattern. The worst that could happen is that it doesn’t work. The beauty of knitting is the ability to simply unravel and start again. You don’t really lose anything and you can try again. 🙂

        Like

  27. Laura C

    I bought a sock loom like the one you have and I swear to Pete it was so tight I couldn’t even get done with the 4th go around. So I undid it and tried again like 7 more times, each time making my passes looser and it was still so tight I could barely get it off the pegs. What in the world am I doing wrong? I was truing to make a little tiny baby sock. Maybe that’s the issue?

    Like

    • This is a common problem for newcomers to the sock loom. The trick is in how you handle the work yarn (the strand in your hand as your working the stitches). There should be little or no tension as you carry the yarn from peg to peg. I don’t even pull the strand between pegs – I just hold it loosely in front of the peg I’m working. When I pull the loop over the work yarn, I still don’t pull – just let the new loop form around the peg and move to the next. The nice thing about these sock looms is the little knob at the top, which ensures stitches stay put as you work. That way there’s no need wrap pegs tightly or maintain tension. Hope this helps. 🙂

      Like

    • Paton’s Kroy Sock yarn is my absolute favorite. They change their colors frequently, so I’d recommend checking it out online.

      Premier Yarns (Deborah Norville Serenity Sock Weight) is another favorite. It’s a little harder to find, but I’ve had luck at JoAnn’s. It’s very sturdy and the colors are great!

      On the pricier end, Malabrigo Sock Yarn is an absolute pleasure the knit. The colors are hand or kettle dyed in a wide range of rich and beautiful shades.

      In the mid-range, Valley Yarns Huntington offers a nice fingering weight yarn that is sturdy and nice to knit. Colors are a bit limited, but I like it well enough!

      Hope this helps!

      Like

  28. Amanda

    Hi! Awesome socks! I just started my first sock on a Boye loom (not great but decent) and the provided instructions told me that for my foot size I should cast on 54 pegs. I did a cuff and am maybe 10 rounds into the body of the sock and the circumference of the sock still seems enormous. The knit rows that are on the long side of the loom have gaps between them (the corner rows and the ones on the short, 5 peg side don’t have this issue) and I’m sure that’s the reason why the sock isn’t tightening up. I don’t think my tension has been bad (it’s easy to pull the loops over but not so easy that they fall off). Am I doing something wrong or will this issue resolve itself as I continue?

    Like

    • The cuff is going to look really big until its a few inches off the loom. The stitches remain stretched to the size of the loom until they’ve had a chance to settle. The corners have gaps for the same reason. Don’t worry, that’s normal. I usually see the cuff start to shrink to a normal size once it’s 3 to 4 inches off the loom. If it doesn’t, then you’ve got a problem with yarn weight/gauge. Yarn that’s too heavy for the loom doesn’t shrink down.

      Like

  29. Dawn Sheppard

    Your socks are fantastic! I have both the KB sock loom & sock loom2 – I was really excited to get them & I tried but they are now sat redundant in their boxes, I struggle with the last side, I find it a nightmare trying to get my hook in & battling with the pegs that are not being used (would be so much easier if they could be removed so they do not restrict getting to the ones needed)- is there a solution to this as I would love to give these another go – the tutorials I have seen make it look so easy but I get to that last side & totally hate it – any tips would be appreciated

    Like

    • Hi! It shouldn’t be a struggle to get your hook in, so that means your loops are way too tight. Loosen up the tension of the initial cast-on and on the working yarn as you knit. You shouldn’t pull or tug the work yarn as you work. It should just lay across the peg with little or no tension. Loops around the pegs should be lightly snug (just enough not to droop). If you can do that, the hook will slide in easily and those extra pegs won’t feel like such an issue. 🙂

      Like

      • Dawn Sheppard

        Thank you so much for your advice, I will give it a go. I also have found a different hook so that may also help make a difference. I don’t like to be beaten by anything I try so I refuse to give up on this. 😊

        Like

      • Dawn Sheppard

        Your advice was spot on!! Thank you so much, I managed to get around the loom and almost had a baby sock but a couple of stitches came off & I couldn’t fix it so I will start again. The main thing is that I no longer hate the ‘slider pegs’ and once my new hook arrives I will be back at it. Thank you for your advice, you have restored my enthusiasm for my sock looms 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  30. Dawn Sheppard

    My new KB cushion loom hook arrived today & it is so much easier to use my sock loom now, with your advice of loose stitches and a hook that is more comfy to hold, I no longer hate my loom!!
    Thank you for your help, it really is appreciated 😊

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s