Wreck This Journal: Garden’s End

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After more than three months of growing and blooming, my garden has finally succumbed to the heat. Flowers have bloomed and started to wither, vegetable seedlings have sprouted and produced an amazing crop. A few stragglers continue to hang on, but the process of letting go must start now. Such is the cycle of life, green must eventually turn brown and return to the earth.

A page in Wreck This Journal has given me a place to memorialize my garden, while also giving me an excuse to play in the dirt.  As per instructions, I grabbed a clod of dirt and rubbed it into the center of the page.  This is the same dirt where my zucchini took root!  I added some sketches of little leaves and flowers that remain in my yard, despite a steady stream of 100+ degree weather.

Playing in the dirt is still fun!

I may be a grown woman, but I will never grow tired of digging around the dirt. A little dirt under my fingernails reminds me of being a little girl in the woods!

In the couple of weeks, we plan on pulling all the summer plants out (which will be super crispy very soon) and begin tilling the ground for a fall garden. We’ve got a compost pile started and a menu of seeds sorted.  Pumpkins, melons, onions, and perhaps another batch of sunflowers will hopefully brighten our back yard.

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c.b.w. 2012

Coloring Isn’t Just For Kids

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While paging through my Wreck This Journal, I came across the “Test Page” where there are instructions to use the space to test out crayons, paints, and other art supplies. The test page reminded me of something I always did in my coloring books as a kid and now as an adult. As a five-year-old and a 34- year-old, I’ve always created color swatches on the inside cover before coloring anything on an actual page.

Scribble, scribble!

Yes, I still color.  Even though it’s an activity mostly reserved for children, I find immense joy in the practice of filling blank spaces with color whether it be Garfield or an intricate Medieval tapestry.  I love how the image changes when color is added, the smell of crayons and colored pencils, the swishing sound of a crayon going back and forth, and the feeling of accomplishment when the page is completed.  The process is very relaxing and cathartic when real life threatens to turn everything black and white.

My drawer is filled with at least twenty coloring books.  Some are brand new while others have been with me since I was a little girl.  The oldest one I have is a Bullwinkle and Rocky coloring book I’ve had since I was about eight years old.  My juvenile scribbles scrawl across half of it, right beside the pages I colored just last week.  Yup, I still color Bullwinkle and all his friends! The inner child in me rejoices, (and she really giggled when I bought a new Smurfs coloring book a few months ago).

Garfield, Barbie, and Bullwinkle are relics from my childhood, but I still color in them on a regular basis. The Smurfs coloring book is a brand new addition to my collection!

Last week’s coloring creation.

When I’m looking for a challenge, I delve into my collection of Dover coloring books which contain highly artistic plates ranging from intricate tile patterns, butterflies, Egyptian art, and complicated geometric designs.  My muse is always challenged to come up with interesting color palettes to fill in all the blank spaces.

Dover coloring books offer unique and artistic images.

From my Medieval Tapestry Coloring Book. It probably took a total of 4 hours to complete.

I stock a wide variety of coloring supplies and I’m always a sucker for something new.  I have everything from crayons (regular, glitter, metallic, variegated,), colored pencils, markers (fat, skinny, classic, bold, and bright), Twistables, glitter glue, and metallic gel pens.  Every time I sit down to color, I make a huge mess and lay out all my coloring utensils.  The possibilities are endless and I love the sense freedom that comes from all those colors.

Part of my collection of coloring supplies.

Once I’ve chosen what coloring book to play in and what image to color, I set about finding the color combinations.  That means making color swatches on a piece of scratch paper or on the inside cover.  After a while, the swatches make for an interesting piece of art in and of themselves.

With all the colors chosen, I let myself get lost in the moment.  If the image is particularly complicated, two hours (or more) will easily fly by without my knowledge.  I’m totally absorbed and the outside world just disappears.  All that matters is color.  No one is ever too old to bask in shades of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple.

Go ahead and grab some crayons.  You know you want to.

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Special Note: Due to some changes made by WordPress, be sure to uncheck the box that says, “Notify me of follow-up comments via email,” if you do not wish to receive e-mails for every new comment on this post.  At the moment, the box is checked as a default, (and I can’t fix it).

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c.b. 2012

Wreck This Journal: Inner Child

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I got so excited when I came across the page in Wreck This Journal, that says “Color this entire page.”  For a girl who never met a box of crayons she didn’t like, this page made me giddy right from the start.  While contemplating the blank page, I was instantly reminded of something my sister and I did when we were kids.  My grandmother showed us how to turn a boring piece of paper into a work of art by simply drawing an endless line of curves and curls until the whole page was filled with a random design.  Then, it was all about filling in the gaps with color, in any sequence or color palette.  Who needs a coloring book when you can make your own pictures?

With that in mind, I took a marker and reverted to my nine-year-old self for my journal page.  I made curves in random directions until I ran out of space and then I picked out the brightest colors from my crayon box.  One by one, I filled in all the spaces until the entire page glowed with color.

I went a little nuts with the crayons!

While I never really ignore my inner child for any extended period of time, this page was a nice reminder to hold onto that little girl inside of me.  Children always see the world with so much wonder and curiosity, as if every day is an adventure. I never want to lose that, no matter how old I get.  There is a such thing as having it both ways – I can be a responsible adult who goes to work every day and pays her bills, but I can also be a girl who plays with crayons and marvels at the world around her with an inherent sense of wonder.

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For previous Wreck This Journal entries, please visit my sidebar and tag cloud.  Stay inspired!

c.b. 2012