Lost in the Zodiac

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Pinch me please,
for I am dreaming.
My legs, you see
have taken their leave.
I can’t escape,
my arms are stuck.
To this I say,
what bad luck!
Those beside me
look the same.
Tell me friend,
is this a game?

Circle of Animals by Ai Weiwei on display in the Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court of Somerset House, London, June 2011, c.b.w.

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Special Note: When I snapped this photograph I had no idea these sculptures were created by Ai Weiwei, nor did I discover that fact until I was in the process of creating this post.  These sculptures were utterly captivating and I remember spending a long time walking among them. I can’t even begin to say how amazing it is to know that I was drawn to his work without even knowing it was his.

In choosing this week’s photograph, I was looking to write something a little playful.  Imagine my surprise when I learned Weiwei was behind this installation, considering I wrote about him barely a week ago,  (see Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry). Apparently, my muse is still quite taken with him!

To read more about Ai Weiwei’s “Circle of Animals,” follow these links:

Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads (official site)

Somerset House – Circle of Animals

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c.b.w. 2012

Sunday on Fleet Street

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After a stroll on Fleet Street nothing ever looks the same . . . .

Fleet Street, London, June 2011, c.b.w.

Interesting facts about Fleet Street:

  • It was named after River Fleet, London’s largest underground river.
  • British newspapers originated on Fleet Street and called the street home until the 1980s.
  • The length of Fleet Street marks London expansion in the 14th century.  The East end of the street marks the spot where the River Fleet ran against the medieval walls of London.
  • At the west end is the Temple Bar, which marks the current City of London/City of Westminster boundary, (extended in 1329).  In addition, the west part of the street was destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666.
  • The barber Sweeney Todd is traditionally said to have lived and worked in Fleet Street.
  • Aside from journalism, Fleet Street is also known for coffee houses and taverns (some of which have been there for centuries).
  • Fleet Street is now more associated with the law and its Inns of Court and barristers’ chambers, because the Royal Courts of Justice and the Central Criminal Court on Old Bailey are nearby.

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Sorry there’s no poem this week.  My muse and I are still on vacation!  I hope a pretty photograph and a little history lesson makes up for the lack of lines.

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c.b.w. 2012

Poetry Poll #2

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The response to Poetry Poll #1 was fantastic, which makes the start of Round 2 all the more exciting. Thanks so much to everyone who participated!

Four more poems are loaded and I’m ready for my wonderful readers to tell me which one stands out above the rest.  Your vote truly does matter as poll results will determine which three poems I will submit to  Wordrunner eChapbooks, (in response to their call for poetry that relates to the theme of “found”).

All polls will remain open until Poll #5 is posted with the finalists.  This is a numbers game, so the poems with the most votes overall across all polls will make it to the final four.  Follow me on Twitter or my page on Facebook, (see  sidebar) for daily updates on poll numbers.

For initial details or to catch up on Round 1, please visit Poetry Poll #1.

Ready for Round 2?  Here we go . . .

Gather Resilience

Where Peace Resides

Shattered

Changing Hands

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Thank you so much for your vote!

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c.b.w. 2012